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Browse Prior Art Database

Printer Paper Stripper with No Added Parts

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000104629D
Original Publication Date: 1993-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 2 page(s) / 105K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cunningham, EA: AUTHOR

Abstract

Many printers for small computers use fan-fold paper with sprocket drive. The paper is normally perforated to allow the edges with the sprocket holes to be torn off which normally is done by hand. An invention that can separate the edges of the paper as it is being printed is disclosed. The invention only requires some modification of the existing parts, with no additional parts required. Also described is an option that allows either stripping or nonstripping, also with no added parts.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

Printer Paper Stripper with No Added Parts

      Many printers for small computers use fan-fold paper with
sprocket drive.  The paper is normally perforated to allow the edges
with the sprocket holes to be torn off which normally is done by
hand.  An invention that can separate the edges of the paper as it is
being printed is disclosed.  The invention only requires some
modification of the existing parts, with no additional parts
required.  Also described is an option that allows either stripping
or nonstripping, also with no added parts.

      Most small printers have a plastic holder that snaps over each
sprocket to hold the paper down.  Each typically has two curved pads
about 1/4 inch wide which press against the paper on each side of the
sprocket holes.  These pads hold the paper against guides that have a
cylindrical surface along a path that the paper follows for part of
the cylinder.  The guides are also about 1/4 inch wide, on each side
of the sprocket.

      The first part of the invention is that the snap-over pressure
pad parts are modified.  The outer pad on each holder is unchanged.
The inner pads are modified for about the last 0.3 inches of the
snap-over guide as the paper leaves the sprocket.  In this part of
the guide, the inner-most edge of the pad is removed so that this
last 0.3 inches is about 1/8 inch wide.  The outer edge of the inner
pads are unchanged, so that the edges of the outer pad and the inner
pad straddle the sprocket teeth.  The object of the change in the
pads is to hold the edge strip down against the lower guide.  The
inner edge of the last 0.3 inches of the inner pad runs almost inward
to the perforation line.  With both snap-over pressure pads modified,
the strips on each edge of the printer paper are still firmly held
against the lower cylindrical guide.

      The second part of the invention is the modification of the
lower guides under the paper.  The area to be modified is that which
is directly under the areas of the exit end of the inner pressure
pads that were removed from the original design.

      On the cylindrical portion of the lower guides, at positions
directly below the recessed regions of the snap-over guides at the
0.3 inches from the ends, a surface tangent to the cylindrical
portions is formed instead of continuing the cylindrical portions to
the end of the pads.  The outermost edges of this "rising" surface
goes very near the perforation line of the paper.  The outer edges of
these surfaces pass very close to the inner edges of of the modified
inner pressure pads.  These lower guide tangential ramps create a
surface that starts to lift the paper away from the sprocket, within
the last 0.3 inches of the top guide.  The paper is thus stretched
over this rising section, with a radially increasing distance from
the axis of the sprocket drive, and the edge is held down by the top
guide.  This causes the same operation as when tearing off the str...