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Sticky Monitor as Call Tracking Architecture

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000104694D
Original Publication Date: 1993-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 2 page(s) / 56K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Nameki, T: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a new monitor called "Sticky Monitor" which is a call tracking architecture enabling continuous monitoring of call state transitions in PBX. Once a call involves a resource monitored in accordance with this architecture, the call gets into sticky monitored state, and the subsequent state transition of the call is continuously reported while the call exists. In the sticky monitored state, the state transition reporting goes on even though the call eventually involves non-monitored resources only.

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Sticky Monitor as Call Tracking Architecture

      This article describes a new monitor called "Sticky Monitor"
which is a call tracking architecture enabling continuous monitoring
of call state transitions in PBX.  Once a call involves a resource
monitored in accordance with this architecture, the call gets into
sticky monitored state, and the subsequent state transition of the
call is continuously reported while the call exists.  In the sticky
monitored state, the state transition reporting goes on even though
the call eventually involves non-monitored resources only.

      Call tracking is to report state transitions of a call so as to
manipulate the call by some means.  In the following, it is assumed
that the host application needs the call tracking and the state
transition reporting is realized by event messages.

      Fig. 1 shows a call scenario that does not use the Sticky
Monitor.  Resources A and B are monitored by the host application,
but resource C is not monitored.  When the call is transferred to a
non-monitored resource C, PBX does not send event messages to the
host and the call tracking in the host application is interrupted.

      Fig. 2 shows a call scenario that uses the Sticky Monitor.
Resources A and B are sticky monitored by the host application, but
resource C is not monitored.  Once the call involves the sticky
monitored resources, PBX continues to send event messages while the
call exists.  Then the host application can...