Browse Prior Art Database

Electronic Phone Book for Video Conferencing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000104809D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 6 page(s) / 205K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Aldred, BK: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is an algorithm for determining the connection paths to be established between two users for desk-to-desk conferencing using preference specification. In computer-based video and desk top conferencing systems there is a need to access electronic phone books to establish conferencing calls. Within a phone book a single person can be expected to have multiple modes of communication. A selection method is described for establishing the appropriate connection paths to be made between any two people.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 27% of the total text.

Electronic Phone Book for Video Conferencing

      Disclosed is an algorithm for determining the connection paths
to be established between two users for desk-to-desk conferencing
using preference specification.  In computer-based video and desk top
conferencing systems there is a need to access electronic phone books
to establish conferencing calls.  Within a phone book a single person
can be expected to have multiple modes of communication.  A selection
method is described for establishing the appropriate connection paths
to be made between any two people.

      A conferencing user frequently has more than one communication
path available, e.g., over the PSTN, over ISDN, or over a LAN.
Different levels of service will be available depending upon the
selected path, e.g., PSTN may restrict the interaction to voice, ISDN
may allow data interchange and limited video, while the LAN may offer
high performance data interchange, with high quality video but no
voice.  Additional interaction is possible;  one user may be able to
accept video coded to the ActionMedia II standard, whilst another
expects video coded to the CCITT H261 standard.  Data and voice offer
similar scope for incompatibility and interworking difficulty.  The
solution described takes advantage of a simple specification of
preferences both in the phone book entries and in the call set-up
request.

      Advantages over pre-defined system selection of appropriate
communication are that it requires only a simple extension to the
electronic phone book, allows a user to individually control the
system selection process, supports multiple concurrent paths between
users for complex calls (i.e., involving multiple data types) and
supports user priorities for different data types at call set-up -
including optional data types.  Also, multiple concurrent data types
per path and alternate data types per path per call are supported
while giving priority to the preferences of the person making the
call and respecting the preferences of the call recipient.

      The phone book computer file typically needs to contain the
following information for each entry.  Identity and related
information of the party (e.g., name, address, location, etc.),
addressing information (repeated for each available communication
path), nature of the communication path, type of communication
permitted (repeated for each type of data), details of data
communication type allowed and user preference for that type of
communication.  A phone book entry may have the following structure:

      This example describes a phone book entry where there are four
different ways of communicating with J. Smith:  over the public
switched telephone network (PSTN), the local area network) LAN, or an
asynchronous data line accessible through a modem over PSTN.
Different data types are supported as follows.  Voice is available in
either analogue or digital form (PSTN or ISDN, respectively).  Data
commu...