Browse Prior Art Database

Left-Shift and Right-Shift Buttons for a Standard Window

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000104864D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 4 page(s) / 176K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

J Fan, T: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article discloses a simple technique to allow a window to easily occupies half of a screen; i.e., two windows will share the entire screen. Other than a "maximize" and a "minimize" button, a standard window will contain two more buttons: the "left-shift" button and the "right-shift" button. The default action for a window whose "left-shift"/ "right-shift" button is clicked is to automatically position/resize itself to occupy the left/right half of the screen. However, the application developer can also tailor such left/right-shift actions by processing the generated messages, namely, WC_LEFTSHIFT and WC_RIGHTSHIFT, in the corresponding window procedures.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

Left-Shift and Right-Shift Buttons for a Standard Window

      This article discloses a simple technique to allow a window  to
easily occupies half of a screen; i.e., two windows will share the
entire screen.  Other than a "maximize"  and a "minimize"  button, a
standard window will contain two more buttons: the "left-shift"
button and the "right-shift"  button.  The default action for a
window whose "left-shift"/ "right-shift" button is clicked is to
automatically position/resize itself to occupy the left/right half of
the screen.  However, the application developer can also tailor such
left/right-shift actions by processing the generated messages,
namely, WC_LEFTSHIFT and WC_RIGHTSHIFT, in the corresponding window
procedures.

      A desktop has limited size.  Running many window applications
on a desktop will clutter the screen with open windows overlaying
each other.  The information presented in a window is therefore
blocked and the user may have difficulty to access all the items of
interest that he requires.  Currently, a standard window provides a
"maximize" button which, upon being clicked, allows the window to
occupy the whole screen, a "minimize"  button which shrinks the
window into an icon, and a "restore"  button which resizes/positions
the window to its previous size/location.  Apparently, the "maximize"
button provides the largest physical space for a window that the user
is currently interested in, and the "minimize"  button releases the
congestion of a crowded desktop and gives room for other window
applications.

      However, because more and more interactions between window
applications are required, the user may want to see information
presented in one window while he is working on another.  For example,
a user who is editing an article using EPM may want to copy a
paragraph from his electronic mail presented in a 3270 emulator
window.  It would be ideal for the user if he can easily "maximize"
these two windows but still be able to see both windows at the same
time.  Unfortunately, current operating systems, such as OS/2,
require the user to resize these windows manually.

      This article discloses a simple technique to allow a window to
easily occupy half of a screen or, more specifically, half of its
parent window's client area; i.e., two windows will share the entire
screen, if their parent is the desktop; otherwise, they will share
the entire client area of its parent window.  The reason of choosing
two is that the user typically focuses his attention on one window
and employs another one as a supportive reference.  Another reason is
that most of the interactions between windows are binary, which only
involves two windows at any point in time.

      Other than a "maximize"  and a "minimize"  button, a standard
window will contain two more buttons: the "left-shift"  button and
the "right-shift"  buttons.  The default action for a window whose
"left-shift"/ "right-shi...