Browse Prior Art Database

Thermal Control of High Powered Devices During Card/Circuit Test

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105004D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 2 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Buller, ML: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Testing of the functional operation of an electronic circuit and/or card sometimes requires a temporary cooling device so that high powered devices can operate at the speed at which they were designed. Shown in Fig. 1 is one embodiment of a technique to temporarily attach a heat sink to a component for test. In this description, an electronic chip is illustrated, but the concept could easily apply to any component package, such as a solder mount device or an area array pin component. In the example of Fig. 1, a thermal heat sink (3) is placed on the device (2) by a clamping mechanism (4), which also asserts a force against the circuit card (1). The technique shown holds the heat sink in place via spring forces, but the clamp (4) could be designed to be actuated by a cam mechanism or any other holding device.

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Thermal Control of High Powered Devices During Card/Circuit Test

      Testing of the functional operation of an electronic circuit
and/or card sometimes requires a temporary cooling device so that
high powered devices can operate at the speed at which they were
designed.  Shown in Fig. 1 is one embodiment of a technique to
temporarily attach a heat sink to a component for test.  In this
description, an electronic chip is illustrated, but the concept could
easily apply to any component package, such as a solder mount device
or an area array pin component.  In the example of Fig. 1, a thermal
heat sink (3) is placed on the device (2) by a clamping mechanism
(4), which also asserts a force against the circuit card (1).  The
technique shown holds the heat sink in place via spring forces, but
the clamp (4) could be designed to be actuated by a cam mechanism or
any other holding device.

      The force applied can be controlled by the spring constant, cam
design, etc.  The heat sink is held against the power dissipating
package with sufficient force to make good thermal contact without
creating stress fractures in any of the interconnecting mechanism.
An interface material (5), such as a thermal grease, may be used to
enhance the thermal interface.  After test, the heat sinking
apparatus is taken off, the device reworked (if required), and the
proper heat sink at- tached for final assembly.  The design of the
heat sinking apparatus shown in Fig. 1 would be a func...