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Intensity and Position estimation for Saturated Sensors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105030D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 2 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Mantey, JP: AUTHOR

Abstract

Bright sources occasionally cause saturation of the sensory cells on the focal plane of surveillance system. The brightness profile becomes so distorted that large errors are introduced into intensity and position estimates based on peak detection means associated with each of the sensors. Significant error reduction is achieved by using a least squares estimation process based on information obtained from outside the saturated cell region.

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Intensity and Position estimation for Saturated Sensors

      Bright sources occasionally cause saturation of the sensory
cells on the focal plane of surveillance system.  The brightness
profile becomes so distorted that large errors are introduced into
intensity and position estimates based on peak detection means
associated with each of the sensors.  Significant error reduction is
achieved by using a least squares estimation process based on
information obtained from outside the saturated cell region.

      Each cell of a sensor array generates primary return records
that save the location, time and peak intensity of each event
observed by the cell.  This disclosure involves an improvement in a
representative return algorithm that collect primary return records
from individual cells and combines them to form a representative
return for each event identified.

      The representative return algorithm starts with the brightest
primary return of a group of primary returns (for a specific subset
of scan of data).  The set of primary returns to be analyzed is
reduced to only those found within a rectangular search area centered
on the brightest primary cell return.  For example, in the large
rectangular area in Fig. 1, the small squares represent the cell
locations when a signal peak is detected and a primary return is
created.  A larger rectangle search area is used when an event is
very bright because the intensity contour map is larger and involves
more...