Browse Prior Art Database

Direct Manipulation Scrolling on Nonprogramable Terminal User Interfaces

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105132D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Najjar, LJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Direct manipulation computer user interfaces allow users to position a cursor on an object to perform an action on the object. This type of user interface is also known as "point and shoot" and is easy to learn and use. Since they lack a mouse and a local computer processor, nonprogrammable terminal user interfaces seldom provide this style of interface. Instead, nonprogrammable terminal user interfaces tend to require the user to press function keys to perform actions.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 58% of the total text.

Direct Manipulation Scrolling on Nonprogramable Terminal User Interfaces

      Direct manipulation computer user interfaces allow users to
position a cursor on an object to perform an action on the object.
This type of user interface is also known as "point and shoot" and is
easy to learn and use.  Since they lack a mouse and a local computer
processor, nonprogrammable terminal user interfaces seldom provide
this style of interface.   Instead, nonprogrammable terminal user
interfaces tend to require the user to press function keys to perform
actions.

      Described is a way of providing direct manipulation scrolling
on nonprogrammable terminal user interfaces.

      Many nonprogrammable terminal user interface design guidelines,
such as [*], provide standard scrolling indicators.  For example, the
IBM design guide requires the following indicators to be included
when, to see more information, the user can scroll a panel or list
left, up, down, and right:  More: <  - + >.

      To scroll the panel or list in these indicated directions, the
user presses function keys.  For example, to scroll down, the user
presses the F8 function key.  To scroll up, the user presses the F7
function key.  This interaction style is very indirect.  When the
user sees the scrolling indicator, the user has to translate the
indicator into a specific key press to scroll the panel or list.
This extra translation step can increase user confusion, user errors,
and the time...