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Library for Application Programming Standards

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105148D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 2 page(s) / 68K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jackson, BJ: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Because companies hire computer programmers at different levels of programming skills, there is a need for a programming library that standardizes program source in a common format. Prior job experience or lack of proper programming etiquette results in poorly developed programs with several different formats depending on the programmer. Programmers who maintain or support these programs, often, have to debug without fully understanding the logic or intentions of the original programmer.

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Library for Application Programming Standards

      Because companies hire computer programmers at different levels
of programming skills, there is a need for a programming library that
standardizes program source in a common format.  Prior job experience
or lack of proper programming etiquette results in poorly developed
programs with several different formats depending on the programmer.
Programmers who maintain or support these programs, often, have to
debug without fully understanding the logic or intentions of the
original programmer.

      This article describes a mechanism which serves as a library
service that stores and formats application program source code based
on customer-defined guidelines.  This library service has the
capability to detect, warn, and correct program syntax errors before
compiling and storing program source.  The primary feature of this
invention is its ability to modify programs with syntax errors before
the actual compilation of the source to produce the run-time
executable module/modules.  Note:  This is the syntax as defined by
an enterprise and not the language of the programming language.  The
factors or rules used for these modification guidelines are
ultimately determined by the customer (company).  However, the
mechanism can default to conventions based on American National
Standards Institute (ANSI) standards if no guidelines are customized.

      The customization of the mechanism is handled ideally by the
software product administrator or systems programmer to input the
conventional standards determined by the company.  For example, a
company may determine that each 'IF-THEN-ELSE' statement of the
source code should be indented on the next line 3 spaces in from the
beginning of the previo...