Browse Prior Art Database

Object Access via Fingerprint Recognition on Mouse Buttons

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105169D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 4 page(s) / 82K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fitzpatrick, GP: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

There is a need to allow multiple users to share a given workstation and to allow secure access to discrete graphical objects assigned to multiple users. Currently, there is no method to allow selection of a subset of a single desktop's objects by multiple users having varying levels of authorization to disparate objects.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Object Access via Fingerprint Recognition on Mouse Buttons

      There is a need to allow multiple users to share a given
workstation and to allow secure access to discrete graphical objects
assigned to multiple users.  Currently, there is no method to allow
selection of a subset of a single desktop's objects by multiple users
having varying levels of authorization to disparate objects.

      Current art in object selection within a graphical user
interface (GUI) environment is managed by the use of device and
program passwords and is limited by techniques such as keyboard- and
mouse-locking programs.  Further, touch-screen technology has enabled
direct object selection by a user's fingers contacting a touch-screen
surface directly over a graphical object.

      The solution to this problem lies in employing existing
fingerprint-recognition technology (well documented in prior art) in
an innovative manner to permit desktop object selection by authorized
users via fingerprint recognition on mouse buttons.

      This article describes a method whereby a user's fingerprints
on mouse buttons can be used to grant access to given desktop
objects.  The figure depicts the relationships among the component
parts.

      Element 000 is a Fingerprint-Sensitive Mouse Button which
detects contact at given points on its surface.  (This component may
consist of a touch-sensitive plate, similar to those used in
conventional fingerprint-sensitive devices.) The mouse button
communicates with two distinct components.

      First, it must communicate with the graphical user interface
component (020) in a conventional manner to indicate which object has
been selected.

      Additionally, it communicates with the Fingerprint Analyzer
(048).  Data about contact points (fingerprint images) is passed to
the Fingerprint Analyzer in a form appropriate for this component to
distinguish a unique fingerprint.  (The details of the transm...