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Editing Arbitrarily Grouped Graphical Elements and Group Member Elements

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105185D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 2 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Delaplain, BJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Interactive program that create and edit graphical elements such as boxes and circles often allow their users to place existing elements in a group temporarily in order to perform a common action on multiple elements simultaneously. If that element grouping persists such that the group itself can be later selected as though it were a single element, the program needs to provide both:

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Editing Arbitrarily Grouped Graphical Elements and Group Member Elements

      Interactive program that create and edit graphical elements
such as boxes and circles often allow their users to place existing
elements in a group temporarily in order to perform a common action
on multiple elements simultaneously.  If that element grouping
persists such that the group itself can be later selected as though
it were a single element, the program needs to provide both:

1.  the ability to select and edit the entire group; for example,
    move or copy the group
2.  the ability to select and edit only a member of the group; for
    example, change the element attributes (style, size) or contents
    (such as text characters).

      The key point is that the user should be able to perform either
of these two selection and editing operations WITHOUT dissolving the
group.

      The model addressed by this disclosure is one in which the user
first creates individual elements and then defines them as a group
using standard Common User Access (CUA) extended selection
techniques.  Group membership disclosure, the elements in the group
need not share a spatial relationship.  Thus, the elements in the
group may not be the only elements contained within a given
rectangular area on the presentation surface.  For example, a page
layout could include elements in two opposing corners of the page (a
box in the top left and a circle in the bottom right) that the user
ma...