Browse Prior Art Database

Quick-Key Command Interpreter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105207D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 1 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cahill Jr, RB: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A keystroke command interpreter that would allow users to save keystroke combinations and the associated user defined execution (prior art). Once the keystroke combination is recorded, users can designate which key or key combinations will be the fast path key for the keystroke combination they just recorded. The tool would include: A tool that would save keystroke combinations (keystroke recording tool - prior art). A file/dataset that would contain the keystroke combinations and the associated execution process. A modification of the operating system command interpreter, adding one level of search to the command hierarchy. The interpreter would now first check the keystroke file for a match between the user keystroke input and the listings in the file. If a match is found the associated execution should occur.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 57% of the total text.

Quick-Key Command Interpreter

       A keystroke command interpreter that would allow users to
save keystroke combinations and the associated user defined
execution (prior art).  Once the keystroke combination is
recorded, users can designate which key or key combinations will
be the fast path key for the keystroke combination they just
recorded.  The tool would include: A tool that would save
keystroke combinations (keystroke recording tool - prior art).
A file/dataset that would contain the keystroke combinations and
the associated execution process.  A modification of the
operating system command interpreter, adding one level of search
to the command hierarchy.  The interpreter would now first check
the keystroke file for a match between the user keystroke input
and the listings in the file.  If a match is found the
associated execution should occur.  A simple usage example would
be if a user wanted to start a command line session every time
he/she pressed Alt-C, it could easily be done.

       A detailed example: The user would choose to initiate the
Quick-Key process (Alt-Shift-K or select "Quick-Key" from a
menu).  An icon that looks like a recorder with a RECORD, STOP
and SAVE button on it would appear.  The user would press
RECORD, the mouse cursor would change appearance to indicate it
is in "record" mode.  The user could then open the System
settings, move to the lockup tab within that folder, and set the
automatic lockup to "No", and then clos...