Browse Prior Art Database

Conduction Augmented Immersion Cooling Scheme

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105240D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 2 page(s) / 76K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chrysler, GM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Described is a means to provide thermal conduction augmentation for electronic package designs utilizing single-phase forced convection or forced convection boiling to cool arrays of electronic chips on a substrate or wiring circuit board. Referring to Fig. 1, a module package assembly is shown comprised of chips 1, mounted on a wiring circuit board or substrate 2, contacted by spring-loaded piston heat sinks 3, within a metal housing 4. The metal housing 4 is mechanically attached to the wiring circuit board 2. Suitable openings 5 are provided in the housing to allow the supply and exit of the coolant. Either dielectric liquids of the perfluorocabon family or liquid nitrogen may be used as a coolant.

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Conduction Augmented Immersion Cooling Scheme

      Described is a means to provide thermal conduction augmentation
for electronic package designs utilizing single-phase forced
convection or forced convection boiling to cool arrays of electronic
chips on a substrate or wiring circuit board.  Referring to Fig. 1, a
module package assembly is shown comprised of chips 1, mounted on a
wiring circuit board or substrate 2, contacted by spring-loaded
piston heat sinks 3, within a metal housing 4.  The metal housing 4
is mechanically attached to the wiring circuit board 2.  Suitable
openings 5 are provided in the housing to allow the supply and exit
of the coolant.  Either dielectric liquids of the perfluorocabon
family or liquid nitrogen may be used as a coolant.  The metal
housing 4 may be grounded to eliminate electrostatic charge build-up
resulting from the flowing dielectric coolant.

      The thermal path for heat dissipation is from the chips 1 to
the piston heat sinks 3, and then to the coolant which flows over the
wiring circuit board 2, chips 1, and heat sinks 3, in the free volume
between the wiring board 2 and housing 4.  A parallel, although less
effective thermal path, exists from the chips 1 through the board 2
to the coolant.  Additional thermal spreading may occur through the
metal housing 4.  Since the main thermal path for heat removal is
from the piston heat sink 3 to the coolant, the allowable mechanical
tolerances to locate the heat sinks 3 in...