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Method of Handling Quotations in Japanese Text-to-Speech

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105257D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 4 page(s) / 100K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Suzuki, K: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a method of handling quotations in text analysis for Japanese text-to-speech conversion.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Method of Handling Quotations in Japanese Text-to-Speech

      This article describes a method of handling quotations in text
analysis for Japanese text-to-speech conversion.

Background - Quotation marks are used in text to indicate the
position of conversational utterances or to emphasize the meanings of
phrases.  In previous Japanese text-to-speech systems, they have
often been ignored in text analysis, in order to simplify the
processing.  Strictly speaking, however, the effect of quotation
marks on speech prosody cannot be neglected if the aim is to generate
highly natural and understandable synthetic speech.  Fig. 1 shows an
example of the effect of quotation marks on speech prosody.  The
first sentence, without quotation marks, includes two major accents,
two minor accents, and one pause.  On the other hand, the second
sentence, with quotation marks, includes three major accents, one
minor accent, and two pauses.  The difference in prosody  is
important in helping listeners to understand the nuances of
quotations.  In order to reflect this difference in synthetic speech,
we propose here a method of handling quotation marks in text analysis
for Japanese text-to-speech conversion.  Proposed method - The
disclosed procedure for handling quotation marks in text analysis is
as follows:

1.  Text decomposition - The analysis of a quotation starts after a
closing quotation mark.  Often, a closing quotation mark divides a
phrase into two shorter phrases.  The phrase after the closing
quotation mark has no content word ("jiritsugo") and consists solely
of function words.  To derive function words in this phrase, the
closing the end-quotation mark is regarded as a con...