Browse Prior Art Database

Ticket Purchasing Multimedia Kiosk

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105309D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 2 page(s) / 70K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Frome, JJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

A method for doing event ticketing in which the customer can walk up to a machine similar to an Automated Teller Machine (ATM), pick the event, pick the seat, see what the view from the seats are like, order a number of tickets, make the payment, and receive the tickets immediately.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Ticket Purchasing Multimedia Kiosk

      A method for doing event ticketing in which the customer can
walk up to a machine similar to an Automated Teller Machine (ATM),
pick the event, pick the seat, see what the view from the seats are
like, order a number of tickets, make the payment, and receive the
tickets immediately.

      The invention works much like an ATM, only better.  The
ticketing machines are located at remote spots.  Inside of the
machine there is a computer, a touch display, credit card reader,
receipt printer, ticket printer, laser disc player (if not
implemented using DVI technology), and a modem.  Each of these remote
machines is set up to do real-time interactive communications with
the main ticketing application which is running on a computer back at
the ticket office.

      The computer application is a standard application, nothing
special.  The remote machines are sending the keystrokes to the
application just like a ticket agent back at the ticket office would
do.

      Following is an example of a typical ticket purchase:  The
multimedia interface plays an attract loop of highlights (exciting
material) while the machine sits idle in a sports bar, airport, mall,
convention center, or hotel.  The video and music played comes from
the laser disc player or from the computer storage if using digital
video interactive technology (DVI).  The potential customer starts
the ticket ordering process by touching the screen, and the
application uses video footage of a team player to explain and prompt
the customer through the process of ordering tickets.  The user is
presented with schedules of home games that allow them to select a
game by just touching a date on the schedule.  Next, they are
presented with a seating map of the stadium showing available seating
for the game they have chosen.  Again, by t...