Browse Prior Art Database

Just-In-Time Disk

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105361D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 2 page(s) / 70K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Manthuruthil, GC: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article proposes a method by which the available disk capacity can be dynamically varied at significant cost savings. This method is a simple and bold way of synergistically exploiting communication infrastructure now in existence and rapid advances in system software technology. It is the called JIT (Just-In-Time) disk.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Just-In-Time Disk

      This article proposes a method by which the available disk
capacity can be dynamically varied at significant cost savings.  This
method is a simple and bold way of synergistically exploiting
communication infrastructure now in existence and rapid advances in
system software technology.  It is the called JIT (Just-In-Time)
disk.

      There is an upper hard limit on the available disk capacity in
all computers.  This limit is more 'visible' in the case of personal,
home computers where the computer is not in a networking environment.
Occasionally, the users need to access extra disk capacity, albeit on
a temporary basis.  This could happen in the case where a program
which requires extra disk capacity is being used for a few days, or a
software package is being tried out for few days.  More importantly,
this temporary need can arise in a 'dynamic' fashion by a running
program.  In case a disk fills up, the program in most cases crashes
or even worse, the operating system crashes, causing significant
hardships to the users.

      The article proposes a method where the operating system IN
BACKGROUND MODE can periodically check the available disk capacity.
Once it falls below a certain threshold, the operating system can
AUTOMATICALLY dial a telephone number using the modem.  The number
will be that of a central disk capacity service which provides disk
sectors for a charge in a disk-sector warehouse.  Once this
allocation is made, this 'telephonic disk' can be assigned a drive
letter ('T' for telephonic) and the operating system can assume it to
be available like any other disk drives (e.g., drives C,A, etc.).
All the future requests by software or the end user to access 'T'
drive  will be redirected to this telephonic disk.

      Software support is required to convert the user requests to
access 'T' drives into proper commands to be passed on to the
telephonic disk.  A software layer is envisaged on the workstation
and on host which will be able to service the requests to the
telephonic disk.  The request from bona fide users can be authorized
by password and userid su...