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Palladium Seeding for Self-Induced Repair of Opens on Thermally Sensitive Substrates

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105363D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chen, CJ: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

There are a number of repair schemes for copper interconnects on printed circuit boards which include laser chemical vapor deposition (LCVD), wire bonding, and self-induced repair (SIR). LCVD and wire bonding produce a discontinuity in the structure of the repaired line which is undesirable from a mechanical point of view. The SIR process has the advantage that it can produce almost seamless repairs by copper plating [1]. While the repair of near-opens can be accomplished quite readily using the SIR process, the repair of complete opens in the lines require a conductive seed layer before the SIR process can be used for plate-up.

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Palladium Seeding for Self-Induced Repair of Opens on Thermally Sensitive Substrates

      There are a number of repair schemes for copper interconnects
on printed circuit boards which include laser chemical vapor
deposition (LCVD), wire bonding, and self-induced repair (SIR).  LCVD
and wire bonding produce a discontinuity in the structure of the
repaired line which is undesirable from a mechanical point of view.
The SIR process has the advantage that it can produce almost seamless
repairs by copper plating [1].  While the repair of near-opens can be
accomplished quite readily using the SIR process, the repair of
complete opens in the lines require a conductive seed layer before
the SIR process can be used for plate-up.

      Disclosed is a seeding and plating process for repair of
complete opens on thermally sensitive substrate materials, like PTFE,
which require lower processing temperatures.  First, a relatively
thick layer of organometallic film (~10 &mu.m) is sprayed on
the substrate.  Second, a focused laser beam is scanned along the the
path to be seeded.  A metal film is then generated along the desired
path by thermal or photochemical decomposition [2].  Third, the
residual organometallic film is washed off with a solvent, e.g., the
same solvent used for spraying it.  Finally, the conductive seed
layer is plated-up using the SIR process to repair the open defect.

      A proven formula for the spraying fluid is one gram of
palladium acetate (Pd...