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Measuring the Tilt of a Robot in an Automated Tape Library

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105401D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 2 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Abbott, P: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The IBM 3495 Tape Library Dataserver (an automated tape library) uses a multiple axis robot mounted on a sled to handle cartridges. Grippers are mounted on the end of the robot arm to pick cartridges. At least one camera is mounted adjacent to the grippers at the end of the robot arm. The entire sled, robot, gripper and camera assembly is referred to as the "accessor".

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 70% of the total text.

Measuring the Tilt of a Robot in an Automated Tape Library

      The IBM 3495 Tape Library Dataserver (an automated tape
library) uses a multiple axis robot mounted on a sled to handle
cartridges.  Grippers are mounted on the end of the robot arm to pick
cartridges.  At least one camera is mounted adjacent to the grippers
at the end of the robot arm.  The entire sled, robot, gripper and
camera assembly is referred to as the "accessor".

      The Camera is attached to a vision system which digitizes the
camera image, and is programmed to analyze the digitized images.  The
camera is used to find alignment targets mounted in the library.

      The robot can be mounted on the sled and tilted along an axis
normal to the page as drawn (Fig. 1) - that is the robot can be
rotated clockwise or counterclockwise as drawn.

      This article describes an automatic method to measure the tilt
of the robot.  An automated method is preferred since no human is
required to be near the robot when the measurement is made.  In
addition, this measurement is made using the cameras that are already
mounted on the gripper assembly - no special tooling is required.

      The robot locates a vision target and records its position
(Fig. 2).  The robot moves its arm horizontally and moves the sled an
equal amount in the opposite direction to again place the camera in
front of the same target.  Another measurement is made.  A series of
these measurements are made at vari...