Browse Prior Art Database

Enabling Multimedia Communications Over the Token Ring

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105408D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-19
Document File: 2 page(s) / 74K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Steinmetz, R: AUTHOR

Abstract

A new distributed resource management protocol is described allowing the transmission of audio and video signals over the Token Ring without any change in hardware.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Enabling Multimedia Communications Over the Token Ring

      A new distributed resource management protocol is described
allowing the transmission of audio and video signals over the Token
Ring without any change in hardware.

      Multimedia communications cover the transmission of discrete
asyn chronous (text and image) and continuous (time-dependent (audio
and video)) media.  The Token Ring is an asynchronous network which
is designed to communicate all types of discrete media.  It is not
con ceived to communicate continuous media, as there is no resource
guar antee (bandwidth) for such media as part of the Token Ring
protocol.

      It is however desirable to transmit all types of media over an
existing Token Ring without changing any part of it and without using
additional hardware.

      New distributed resource management protocol - Each multimedia
station has an Available Resource Table ('ART') describing the
bandwidth available for continuous media of one LAN (local area
network) and groups already used for multicasting (identified, for
example, by functional addresses).  The initial bandwidth of the
various stations is defined to be about 80% (or some other value) of
the total throughput (3.2 or 12.8 MBit/sec.  for the Token Ring).

      The resource management of the multimedia stations belongs to
one group.  Each multimedia station can address this group by using
the multicasting and/or broadcasting facilities existing in the Token
Ring protocol.

      In order to transmit audio and video signals, the requesting
station first compares its request with the bandwidth available.  If
the actual LAN bandwidth stored in the 'art' is smaller than the
required throughput, the request is immediately rejected.  On the
other, if the actual bandwidth is equal to or larger than the
required throughput (and there is a group (i.e., group identifier)
that is not yet used in the case of mul...