Browse Prior Art Database

Minimized and Maximized Window Appearance and Behavior as Just Another Window

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105512D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Henshaw, SF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A method for presenting windows such that a window is never presented in a state such as minimized or maximized is described. The window is simply sized to a particular size, and bookmarks are added to save useful sizes, and can be returned to easily.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Minimized and Maximized Window Appearance and Behavior as Just Another Window

      A method for presenting windows such that a window is never
presented in a state such as minimized or maximized is described.
The window is simply sized to a particular size, and bookmarks are
added to save useful sizes, and can be returned to easily.

      In today's graphical user environments, windows can be resized
to more appropriately fit data displayed therein, or to better
organize the windows on the desktop in order to see the maximum or
most important information.  The designer of an application defines a
default size for each window opened within the application.  Once a
user changes this size, however, the window cannot be easily be
changed back to this default.  Also, all existing graphical
environments introduce two additional artificial sizes, maximized and
minimized, as window states rather than specific sizes.  This
disclosure proposes a new window standard, whereby a user can specify
any meaningful state simply be sizing the window, and can set
bookmarks at important and meaningful sizes for a quick return to any
of them.

      This solution introduces the paradigm for window sizes as an
item completely under the control of a user.  The only item that will
change the size of a window is the return to an existing bookmark.
This simply changes the size of a window, and does not reduce any of
the user's ability to again modify the size directly, from the
current window's size.

      This disclosure centers on treating windo...