Browse Prior Art Database

Page Flipping for User Interfaces

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105518D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 4 page(s) / 144K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Holzman, TG: AUTHOR

Abstract

This invention offers forward and backward paging controls and indicators based on the familiar book metaphor as an alternative to currently used, less intuitive scroll bars. Its greatest benefits will be realized with touch-sensitive computer screens, but it can be used with any input mechanism.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 43% of the total text.

Page Flipping for User Interfaces

      This invention offers forward and backward paging controls and
indicators based on the familiar book metaphor as an alternative to
currently used, less intuitive scroll bars.  Its greatest benefits
will be realized with touch-sensitive computer screens, but it can be
used with any input mechanism.

      As shown in the Figure, this invention displays text or
graphical information as it would look if it were shown on the page
of a magazine or paperback book.  The previously read page is curled,
or folded, to the back.  When forward paging is possible, the right
margin of the page provides a three-dimensional book thickness
indication that more pages remain.  The user can then flip forward by
simply touching any portion of this right edge view of the remaining
pages of the book.

      This invention readily accommodates backward paging as well.
To page backward, the user simply pushes on the curled-back portion
of the document, much as a paper page of a book would be flipped
back.  Likewise, the curled section serves as a constantly in focus
indicator of whether backward paging is possible.  On the first page
of any document, there will be no curl along the left margin, just as
an unopened book or magazine has no curl.  However, once the user has
gone beyond the first page, the curl will be present along the left
margin of the document.  The thickness of the curl, as viewed at the
bottom of the curl cylinder, can also indicate the amount of backward
paging that is possible.

      This invention has several advantages.  First, it is highly
intuitive, being based on something as familiar as reading a book or
magazine.  The user simply pushes on a page to flip it in a manner
that is physically similar to turning a paper page.  Second, when
reading something from a touch-sensitive screen, the user never has
to move his visual focus from the page in order to find the mouse or
the correct portion of the scroll bar.  The user remains
"task-focused" rather than being led into a psychological mode, where
the viewing task is interrupted in order to attend to unnatural
computer controls (e.g., Page Down key or scroll button).  Similarly,
the user doesn't have to locate the position of a slider arm on a
scroll bar in order to determine whether more scrolling can be done.
That  is readily apparent at all times from the thickness and curl of
the pages.  The thickness and curl depictions span the entire
vertical dimension of the page, so they are always easy to see,
regardless of what line the user is examining.

      This invention can also accommodate the use of tabs along the
edge of the document to facilitate jumping ahead by multiple pages
when that is appropriate.  Tabs can be found in the "Settings" view
in OS/2* 2.0, but there a tab must be used for every single page
movement.  That, in turn, requires a separate tab for every page,
something that is not practical or desi...