Browse Prior Art Database

Pointer-Finding Message Boxes

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105541D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cahill, LM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In current systems, message boxes appear on the screen positioned somewhat randomly. For frequent mouse users, this presents additional workload to reposition the mouse pointer on the appropriate message box pushbutton and click. Once the message clears, the user must again reposition the mouse pointer to resume work.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 94% of the total text.

Pointer-Finding Message Boxes

      In current systems, message boxes appear on the screen
positioned somewhat randomly.  For frequent mouse users, this
presents additional workload to reposition the mouse pointer on the
appropriate message box pushbutton and click.  Once the message
clears, the user must again reposition the mouse pointer to resume
work.

      Two possible approaches are disclosed that allow mouse users to
respond to system messages without additional workload to move the
mouse to the box.

1.  Pointer-finding message boxes - in this approach, the message box
    would look first where the mouse pointer is currently located and
    position itself so that the default pushbutton on the box (e.g.,
    OK) is located directly underneath the mouse pointer.  The user
    need only click to select it.  No mouse repositioning is
    necessary.
2.  Automatic temporary mouse repositioning - in this approach, the
    message box appears in a normal position, but the mouse pointer
    is automatically moved to default pushbutton in the message box
    so that the user need only click to select it.  Once the user
    does click, the mouse pointer automatically returns to its'
    previous position.

      These techniques would be most useful for message boxes that
the user must respond to before resuming work.  These techniques
could also be extended to simple dialog boxes where there is
infrequent data entry or chang...