Browse Prior Art Database

Inverted Menus for Graphical User Interfaces

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105542D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Haynes, TR: AUTHOR

Abstract

Users of Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs) such as OS/2* 2.0 are accustomed to interacting with menus in the form of menu bar (action bar) pulldowns and context (pop-up) menus. Due to object placements within the limited surface area of the display, it is sometimes necessary to display these menus above the object rather than below. This can cause the user to be forced to move the pointing device farther than necessary to select the desired choice.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 97% of the total text.

Inverted Menus for Graphical User Interfaces

      Users of Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs) such as OS/2* 2.0 are
accustomed to interacting with menus in the form of menu bar (action
bar) pulldowns and context (pop-up) menus.  Due to object placements
within the limited surface area of the display, it is sometimes
necessary to display these menus above the object rather than below.
This can cause the user to be forced to move the pointing device
farther than necessary to select the desired choice.

      One of the tenets of good user interface design is to place the
most commonly selected choices at the top of menus, since the user
has less distance to move the pointer to select items at the top.
When a menu is displayed over the object, as described above, the
advantage becomes a disadvantage as now the most commonly selected
objects are farthest away.

      This invention calls for menus that are presented above the
object of interest to be 'inverted', so that the most commonly
selected items are still closest to the pointing device.  The
inventor acknowledges that a disadvantage of this proposal is that
user recognition of the ordering of menu items is somewhat disrupted;
however, the ordering is left intact, albeit upside-down.

      The benefits of this invention are:

o   Reduces the distance a user must move the pointing device to
    select the most commonly chosen items on a GUI menu.
o   Easily implemented in current GUI programming env...