Browse Prior Art Database

Overloaded Menu Choice to Access Defaults

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105543D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Haynes, TR: AUTHOR

Abstract

Users of Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs) such as OS/2* 2.0 are accustomed to interacting with menus in the form of menu bar (action bar) pulldowns and context (pop-up) menus. Some of the choices presented in these menus represent actions that may have associated parameters. Users need to be able to choose the action with a default set of parameters, or be able to choose the action and also specify a different set of associated parameters.

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Overloaded Menu Choice to Access Defaults

      Users of Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs) such as OS/2* 2.0 are
accustomed to interacting with menus in the form of menu bar (action
bar) pulldowns and context (pop-up) menus.  Some of the choices
presented in these menus represent actions that may have associated
parameters.  Users need to be able to choose the action with a
default set of parameters, or be able to choose the action and also
specify a different set of associated parameters.

      A good example of this sort of action is 'print'.  Two common
solutions to the presented problem in GUIs are cascading menus and
separate menu choices.  For example, the 'Print' menu choice might
lead to a cascading (secondary) menu, which in turn allows the user
to choose either the default print parameters (e.g., number of
copies, printer ID, etc.), or to open a dialog allowing the user to
specify different parameters.  Further, the cascading menu can be
opened automatically when the menu choice 'Print' is selected, or on
demand if the cascade icon (a right arrow in OS/2 2.0) is enclosed in
a box.  Either alternative can lead to visual complexity and user
confusion.  Separate menu choices can be exemplified for the 'print'
function by having two choices on the menu: 'Print' and 'Print...'.
'Print' immediately prints the associated object using the default
parameters.  'Print...' brings up the dialog allowing the user to
specify different parameter choices.  Again, visual complexity is the
problem.

      Thi...