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Browse Prior Art Database

Mouse-Cursor Desktop Location Recognition Upon Keystroke Activation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105544D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 80K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, WJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

OS/2* lacks the ability to quickly find the desktop cursor on the display. The desktop cursor is prone to becoming lost because of its small size and neutral color. To find it users currently make mouse movements in order to catch the cursor's movement with the eye. A method which reduces wasted user interaction, enriches the OS/2 Presentation Manager* environment and allows the user to quickly recognize the mouse cursor desktop location is desirable.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Mouse-Cursor Desktop Location Recognition Upon Keystroke Activation

      OS/2* lacks the ability to quickly find the desktop cursor on
the display.  The desktop cursor is prone to becoming lost because of
its small size and neutral color.  To find it users currently make
mouse movements in order to catch the cursor's movement with the eye.
A method which reduces wasted user interaction, enriches the OS/2
Presentation Manager* environment and allows the user to quickly
recognize the mouse cursor desktop location is desirable.

      The OS/2 Presentation Manager* (PM) is a windowed environment.
Many actions are performed with the desktop cursor.  This pointer is
always located on the display but it can move itself almost entirely
off the desktop to the right and bottom.  When this happens the
cursor's location is not easily recognized.

      This invention describes an OS/2 key sequence which causes the
desktop cursor to center itself on the display.  A method is
described within whereby the operating system will center the desktop
cursor on the display when a user enters a specific key sequence.

      This invention describes an OS/2 key sequence which causes the
desktop cursor to center itself on the display.  When a user cannot
locate the desktop cursor on the display he/she can enter the key
sequence and the cursor will move itself to the center of the
display.

      For example, when a user performs a CTRL-ESC key sequence to
make the active session the Presentation Manager Desktop with the
Active Task List having focus.  The mouse cursor desktop location is
often not immediately apparent.  At this point a user might begin
moving the desktop mouse device around in a random fashion in order
to allow the eyes' natural movement spotting ability to locate the
mouse cursor on the PM Desktop.

      Instead of moving the desktop mouse device, the current
invention allows the user to simply give the keystroke sequence
(e.g., CTRL-TILDE).  The mouse cursor would immediately move to the
center of the display causing it to be easily located by the user.
The keystroke sequence described is used a...