Browse Prior Art Database

Method for System Integrity Utilizing Independent Interceptor of Specified Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105563D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 77K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, WJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Described is an implementation for an operating system Basic Input/Output (I/O) System (BIOS) such that deleted/renamed files are not actually deleted/renamed on a system until a reconciliation occurs, thereby protecting a file system from unwarranted changes.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Method for System Integrity Utilizing Independent Interceptor of Specified Applications

      Described is an implementation for an operating system Basic
Input/Output (I/O) System (BIOS) such that deleted/renamed files are
not actually deleted/renamed on a system until a reconciliation
occurs, thereby protecting a file system from unwarranted changes.

      Current systems do not prevent a user from deleting/renaming
files, particularly when the files are deleted/renamed with operating
system commands or applications which do not enforce authentication.
An inexperienced or careless user is able to delete/rename files.  A
mechanism is needed whereby a system prevents unwarranted file
renaming/deleting, particularly when a system is being used by
inexperienced or careless users.  There is also a need to protect
system integrity from specific applications.  A method for
selectively protecting the system from specific application use is
needed, particularly if an application is known to have bugs or the
user of the application is known to produce errors.  Furthermore, in
the event an undesirable I/O occurred or many I/Os occurred, there is
a need to automatically rebuild back the file system to the desired
prior state.

      An operating system Basic I/O System (BIOS) is described such
that deleted/renamed files are not actually deleted/renamed on a
system until a reconciliation occurs.  Any file which is
deleted/renamed appears to have been deleted/renamed on the system
and file management continues as it normally would.  However, the
preferred embodiment makes a copy of the deleted/renamed file and
stores it to a safe storage area unknown to all users except a system
administrator who performed install of the method described herein.
The file is stored with a uniquely generated name along with a logged
entry which contains the fully qualified (path) deleted/renamed file
name, date/time stamp of the delete/rename operation and the new
fully qualified file name in the case of a file rename.  The log is
subsequently used to reconcile all...