Browse Prior Art Database

High-Speed Tape Winding Mechanism

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105575D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 62K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Eaton, JH: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The next generation of tape drives will offer larger data storage capacity while preserving or improving access times. To accomplish both goals, thinner tape will be used and the tape will be transported at higher speeds than previously attempted. However, it has been observed that when winding very thin smooth tape, so much air is entrained in the windings that the wraps begin to slip relative to each other. If the tape is stored in this condition, the staggered wraps can lead to loss of data on the outer tracks.

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High-Speed Tape Winding Mechanism

      The next generation of tape drives will offer larger data
storage capacity while preserving or improving access times.  To
accomplish both goals, thinner tape will be used and the tape will be
transported at higher speeds than previously attempted.  However, it
has been observed that when winding very thin smooth tape, so much
air is entrained in the windings that the wraps begin to slip
relative to each other.  If the tape is stored in this condition, the
staggered wraps can lead to loss of data on the outer tracks.

     Disclosed here is a device which allows precise winding of thin,
smooth magnetic tape onto a takeup spool at very high speeds.  The
mechanism is shown in the accompanying figures.  The guiding elements
are two polished fingers of stainless steel or other suitable
material, separated by a distance slightly greater than the maximum
width of the tape to form a "channel" guide.  The guiding fingers are
attached to a hydrodynamic tape bearing, shown in Fig. 1, which is
springloaded against the freely suspended length of tape approaching
the takeup spool.  The purpose of the bearing is to allow the guiding
fingers to travel in and out, as the radius of the spool changes.
The fingers then guide the tape onto the takeup spool by physically
contacting the tape edges, but only contacting the outer few wraps
which require it.  The hydrodynamic bearing is then mounted on an
axle allowing it to pivot at tape start...