Browse Prior Art Database

Gray-Level Image Processing Method for Electronic Parts Catalog Application

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105595D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 62K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Do, PK: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Described is a method where gray-level images can be processed for fast retrieval and display while maintaining good information content. First, the images are reduced from 256 gray levels (8-bit data) to 4 gray levels (2-bit data) using the Histogram Mapping method. Each resultant image is split into two bi-level (1-bit data) planes which will be compressed using the standard bi-level image compression algorithms. During the retrieving phase, the planes are decompressed separately and combined to recreate the coded image. Due to the unique nature of the Histogram Mapping method, support of the pseudo coloring technique is a natural extension.

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Gray-Level Image Processing Method for Electronic Parts Catalog Application

      Described is a method where gray-level images can be processed
for fast retrieval and display while maintaining good information
content.  First, the images are reduced from 256 gray levels (8-bit
data) to 4 gray levels (2-bit data) using the Histogram Mapping
method.  Each resultant image is split into two bi-level (1-bit data)
planes which will be compressed using the standard bi-level image
compression algorithms.  During the retrieving phase, the planes are
decompressed separately and combined to recreate the coded image.
Due to the unique nature of the Histogram Mapping method, support of
the pseudo coloring technique is a natural extension.  In addition,
low cost retrieval and display systems are possible since almost all
standard bi-level image compression algorithms can be implemented
efficiently and entirely in software.  See the figure for a summary
of the process.

      To effectively use the histogram mapping, the user needs to
study, identify, and match the main information components in the
original image to the "peaks" registered in the histograph of the
256-gray-level scanned image.  Since the output image can have up to
four gray levels, up to four "peaks" or information components can be
coded or preserved.  In other words, different thresholds can be set
to divide the gray level dimension of the histogram into at least
four intervals to separate the "peaks".  The pixels belonging to
different interval...