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Browse Prior Art Database

User Interface to Multi-valued Graphical Notebook Tabs

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105676D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 6 page(s) / 118K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fitzpatrick, GP: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Described is a technique to directly access an index into data when the number of indices is greater than the number of graphical tabs which may be displayed in a single row or column.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

User Interface to Multi-valued Graphical Notebook Tabs

      Described is a technique to directly access an index into data
when the number of indices is greater than the number of graphical
tabs which may be displayed in a single row or column.

      Current art for graphical user interface (GUI) notebook
controls associates each tab with only one possible user choice.
Sometimes there are so many choices that it is not feasible to show
all of them in one view to the user.  For instance, Fig. 1 shows a
notebook control being used in an address book application.  Sizing
constraints on the tabs preclude the showing of all 26 alphabet
letter tabs to the user at once, forcing the user to laboriously
scroll the tab field to get to non-visible letters.  With this
existing approach, a user may not be able to access an index in one
operation.

       Prior art describes a related technique: an area-sensitive
icon.  When the user double-clicks on such an icon with the mouse
selection button, the resulting action varies depending on where
exactly in the icon area the hot spot of the mouse cursor was located
when the action occurred.  For instance, if the icon was for an
address book, it might be set up such that when the user
double-clicked in the upper part of the icon, the resulting window
view would show address book entries located in the beginning of the
alphabet, e.g. A,B,C...  (Fig. 2-A), whereas if the double-click
occurred in the bottom of the icon, the end of the alphabet might be
the default view, e.g. ...X,Y,Z, (Fig. 2-B).  This technique has a
disadvantage in that only a single icon is shown and the indices are
not presented directly.

      Another related existing technique involves the use of more
than one row or column of tabs.  This technique has a disadvantage in
that it is graphically unattractive when presented on a
two-dimensional screen.  This approach also typically uses a large
amount of screen space to present all of the tabs.

      In the approach described in this article, let the number of
indices, i, be greater than the number of tabs, t.  The size of a tab
is sufficient to allow more than one index to be displayed on a
single tab.  The maximum number of indices on a single tab is given
by i/t rounded up to an integer.  The indices are then distribute...