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Command Line Interpreter that Adjusts to a User

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105748D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 4 page(s) / 80K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Haymes, CL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Operating systems that rely on command line entry require that the user enter the commands perfectly. These operating systems use a command interpreter which parses the standard input coming from the keyboard. If a user misspells a command, the user usually gets an enlightening message like "command not found". When users become more familiar with the system, they tend to type faster and make more typing errors. Re-typing a misspelled command two or three times over is frustrating, and it is even more frustrating if it is consistently the same typing error. The procedure described in this article expands the ability of a simple command interpreter to understand consistently misspelled commands.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Command Line Interpreter that Adjusts to a User

Figure 1.  PROGRAM FLOW FOR MODIFIED COMMAND INTERPRETER

      Operating systems that rely on command line entry require that
the user enter the commands perfectly.  These operating systems use a
command interpreter which parses the standard input coming from the
keyboard.  If a user misspells a command, the user usually gets an
enlightening message like "command not found".  When users become
more familiar with the system, they tend to type faster and make more
typing errors.  Re-typing a misspelled command two or three times
over is frustrating, and it is even more frustrating if it is
consistently the same typing error.  The procedure described in this
article expands the ability of a simple command interpreter to
understand consistently misspelled commands.

      After an incorrect command is entered, this procedure not only
returns the normal error to the user, but it also saves the incorrect
command for future use.  Each future erroneous keyboard entry will be
compared with the saved command, and if it is the same entry, an
occurrence counter will be updated.  If the occurrence counter goes
above a preset threshold, the user is asked if an alias should be set
to represent this commonly occurring error.  Figure 1 shows a
flowchart representing this operation.  Setting an alias is a
normally available feature on most operating systems, i.e., synonym
files on VM, .csrc files on AIX* and UNIX**.  The command interpreter
can easily update the alias listing to include a new entry.  After
the alias is established, any time the user misspells the alias
command, it will be redirected to what the user intended to type.

Following is a DOS example of how this would work as shown below:

C>dor
Bad command or file name
C>dir
 .
 .
 .
 .
C>dor
Bad command or file name
"dor" has been typed 30 times in the last 200 days.
Do you wish to create an alias to another common
command? (Y/N)
Y
Type in the correct command:
dir
An alias has been set, thank you.
C>
 .
 .
 .
C>dor
 .
COMMAND  COM    29281  11-03-90  11:58a
NETWORK      <DIR>      3-04-91   2:...