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Trace Directed Program Restructuring of Tightly Coupled Software Modules

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105779D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Heisch, RR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Reduced performance due to memory cache collisions resulting from a thread of execution on the same processor which spans multiple software modules.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 55% of the total text.

Trace Directed Program Restructuring of Tightly Coupled Software Modules

      Reduced performance due to memory cache collisions resulting
from a thread of execution on the same processor which spans multiple
software modules.

      The Trace Directed Program Restructuring (TDPR) method of
improving program performance by optimizing cache utilization can
provide significant performance gains when used on a single program.
TDPR groups highly executed sequences of instructions together in
such a way as to maximize cache utilization by reducing cache space
allocation to little or never used instruction sequences as well as
by reducing direct mapped or N-way set associative cache collisions
for a single program.

      However, when running a program which utilizes external
functions from one or more different software modules or libraries,
using TDPR on the program alone or separately on both the program and
these external functions will not promote efficient use of the cache.
More probably, tightly coupled programs and external functions, i.e.,
programs that frequently call external functions, will exhibit a
tendency to collide on cache lines and invalidate each others
instructions.  This results in an overall decrease in performance
even though the program and external functions, when exercised
separately, may not indicate performance problems.

      The technique described here employs the TDPR method on the
interaction of the program and the external fu...