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Strained Semiconductor Layers for Maskless Selective Area Deposition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105781D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 83K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Buchan, NI: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A semiconductor mask would be desirable for selective area deposition (SAD). In contrast to traditional dialectric insulating masks like SiO sub x or Si sub x N sub y, a semiconductor mask would be of high purity, defect-free, and lattice-matched at the mask-device interface, could be conductive, and would allow for new design and processing possibilities. This method shows that strained semiconductor layers can be successfully used for maskless selective area deposition.

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Strained Semiconductor Layers for Maskless Selective Area Deposition

      A semiconductor mask would be desirable for selective area
deposition (SAD).  In contrast to traditional dialectric insulating
masks like SiO sub x or Si sub x N sub y, a semiconductor mask would
be of high purity, defect-free, and lattice-matched at the
mask-device interface, could be conductive, and would allow for new
design and processing possibilities.  This method shows that strained
semiconductor layers can be successfully used for maskless selective
area deposition.

      The selective area deposition (SAD) of semiconductor materials
is of great importance to various applications.  In particular,
growth of III-V materials in openings on masked substrates, during
molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy
(MOVPE), is of use for the fabrication of optoelectronic integrated
circuits [1,2].  The mask materials are traditionally SiO sub x or Si
sub x N sub Y.  The essential condition for SAD is that the
incorporation rate of adsorbed molecules on the mask be very much
slower relative to the incorporation rate on the substrate.  The low
incorporation rate on the mask is in part achieved due to the
transport of group III ad-molecules off the mask by surface diffusion
(over distances on the order of mu m [2]  to the mask openings where
the material is then deposited.

      Diffusion of group III ad-molecules over large distances is
also observed on semiconductor surfaces [3].  This method proposes
that the appropriate selection of a non-tradtional semiconductor mask
material will also result in SAD similar to that achieved with
traditional SiO sub x or Si sub x N sub y masks.  As an example, the
incorporation rate of InP on an In sub x Ga sub 1-x As mask 1 can be
low relative to that on the openings to the InP substrate 2,
resulting in the SAD if InP, as shown in Fig. 1.  Moreover, we show
that a strongly strained...