Browse Prior Art Database

Thin Film Transistor Liquid Crystal Diode with Phase Change Liquid Crystal

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105845D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Makino, S: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes Thin Film Transistor (RTF) Liquid Crystal Diode (LCD) using phase-change liquid crystals which switch between transparent state and opaque or scattering state. This type of LCD does not use light polarization so that high light intensity is available because a polarizer layer is not used. In addition, a wider view angle results.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Thin Film Transistor Liquid Crystal Diode with Phase Change Liquid Crystal

      This article describes Thin Film Transistor (RTF) Liquid
Crystal Diode (LCD) using phase-change liquid crystals which switch
between transparent state and opaque or scattering state.  This type
of LCD does not use light polarization so that high light intensity
is available because a polarizer layer is not used.  In addition, a
wider view angle results.

      To provide dark background when the liquid crystal is in the
transparent state, TFTs are structured on a light-absorbing layer on
glass substrate or light absorbing glass substrate.

      In the Figure, light-absorbing layer 2 of Ge-O2 or Si;Ge;H2 is
formed on glass substrate 1.  A 500 nm thickness of Ge-O2 or 300 nm
thickness of Si;Ge;H2 gives more than 2 optical density at 612 nm of
light wavelength.  When the resistivity of the layer 2 is not
sufficient, insulating layer 3 of SiO2 would be deposited on the
layer 2.  TFT 4 and electrode 5 are then formed by an ordinary
process on the layer 3.  Phase-change liquid crystal 8 is filled in
the space between the TFT and opposing glass plate 6 which carries
electrodes 7.

      Auxiliary light-absorbing plate 9 may be additionally used to
obtain desired optical density.

      The glass substrate 1 coated with light-absorbing layer 2 may
be substituted with a light absorbing glass substrate (not shown).