Browse Prior Art Database

Method of Packaging Discrete Electronic Entities

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105849D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 119K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Mok, LS: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a method of packaging multiple electronic entities which are interconnected together through cables in a common housing. Fig. 1 is a 3-D view of the housing with most of the electronic entities moved away for showing its internal structure. The housing 11 is subdivided into numerous compartments 12 using horizontal and vertical dividers 13 and 14. The dividers are made of structural materials which are electrically and thermally conductive. The dividers are then welded, adhered, or bolted together to form the compartments. The size and number of the compartments shown in the figure is an example only. They can be varied as desired. The electronic entities are to be inserted and secured in these compartments.

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Method of Packaging Discrete Electronic Entities

      Disclosed  is  a  method  of  packaging  multiple electronic
entities which are interconnected together through cables in a common
housing.  Fig. 1 is a 3-D  view  of  the  housing with  most of the
electronic entities moved away for showing its internal structure.
The housing 11  is  subdivided  into numerous  compartments  12
using  horizontal  and  vertical dividers 13 and 14.  The  dividers
are  made  of  structural materials  which  are electrically and
thermally conductive.  The dividers are then welded, adhered, or
bolted together to form  the  compartments.  The  size  and   number
of   the compartments  shown  in  the figure is an example only.
They can be varied as desired.  The electronic entities are to be
inserted and secured in these compartments.  The  electronic entities
can  be compute units, power supplies, hard files, tape drives,
optical disk drives, etc.  A partially inserted compute unit 15 is
shown in the figure.

      The details of the structure of a compute unit is shown in Fig.
2.  The unit is contained in a partially open box  20 which  consists
of  a base plate 21, a front wall 22, and a rear wall 23.  There are
optional support members 24, 25, and 26 along with the bars 27  and
28  to  make  the  box  more robust.  Those support members and bars,
if needed, are to be mounted  onto the box after all of the
electronics are being assembled inside  the  box.  This  will  make
an  automated assembly easier.  The location of the support members
24, 25, and 26 is chosen such that the printed-wiring boards 31 and
32 can be plugged and unplugged freely without moving the support
members.  The printed-wiring boards 31,  32,  and 33 are shown here
for an illustration only.  The box 20 could be used to house
something else.  The three faces of box 20  remain  open  and the
three edges of the front and rear walls 22 and  23  associated  with
these  three  faces  are covered  with electrically conductive
gaskets 41 and 42.  The gaskets 41 and 42 can be electrically
conductive polymers or spring gaskets, as shown in the figure.  The
purpose  of  the gaskets  41 and 42 is to seal the gaps between the
box walls 22 and 23 and the dividers 13 and 14 after  the  box  20
is secured  into  the  compartment.  Since the dividers and the walls
are made of electrically conductive materials, the box will  provide
a  complete  shield  to electromagnetic radiation when it is in the
compartment.  If the box 20 is to be cooled by forced-air convection
then electric fans 53 and 54  and  the  perforations  51  and 52 on
the front and rear walls can be used.  The location of the fans can
be anywhere in the box 20 so long as the air can flow from the front
to rear  wall  or  vice  versa.  When the box 20 is placed in a
compartment, the dividers 13 and 14  will  form...