Browse Prior Art Database

Method of Scene Hierarchy Information Management for Video Image Database

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105861D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 4 page(s) / 113K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kusaba, M: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a physical data model that is used to describe a hierarchical scene structure in a motion picture, and a method for managing information on scene hierarchy. Motion pictures consist of frame sequences with the usual 30 still images a second. The hierarchy has three basic levels: frame, cut, and scene. The objectives of the disclosed methods are to provide a data structure for storing scene hierarchy information and to build the structure effectively from cut sequences by means of seven basic operators (specify, query, copy, delete, move, split, and merge).

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Method of Scene Hierarchy Information Management for Video Image Database

      Disclosed is a physical data model that is used to describe a
hierarchical scene structure in a motion picture, and a method for
managing information on scene hierarchy.  Motion pictures consist of
frame sequences with the usual 30 still images a second.  The
hierarchy has three basic levels: frame, cut, and scene.  The
objectives of the disclosed methods are to provide a data structure
for storing scene hierarchy information and to build the structure
effectively from cut sequences by means of seven basic operators
(specify, query, copy, delete, move, split, and merge).

      As shown in Fig. 1, the hierarchical structure is defined as a
"hierarchy bitmap" with 2-Dmax-bit sequences for each cut, where Dmax
is a constant of the maximum hierarchical depth of scenes.  The upper
sequence, consisting of  "depth bits," describes the depth of a scene
hierarchy at a specific cut, and the lower sequence, consisting of
"start bits," describes the starting cut of each scene hierarchy.  As
in the example in Fig. 2, if the hierarchy depth of a cut is "i," the
first "i" depth bits are defined as true, and  if a cut belongs to
the starting scene of depth "i," the equivalent start bit is defined
as true.

      This structure defines only the relative hierarchy depth of
scenes in a motion picture, not the absolute one.  The absolute
location of a cut in a scene hierarchy is not defined in this data
structure, but it is possible to describe it in a more general way as
a list of hierarchical classifications, such as chapter, section, and
subsection.  This absolute location is called the "hierarchy
address." In Fig. 2, A23 is a hierarchy address which specifies the
absolute hierarchy of the cut but its hierarchy bitmap ("111 001")
only shows the relative hierarchy.

      Seven basic operators are used in authoring hierarchy bitmaps
for managing scene hierarchy.

1.  The Specify operator sums up the changes in the hierarchy depth
    from the last-to-the-present referenced cut, and obtains the
    hierarchy address.  The summation of the changes from the last to
    the present referenced cut is added to the last referenced
    hierarchy address.  In Fig. 2, there are one change in the second
    depth and 3 changes in the third depth between A12 and A23.  This
    operator obtains the hierarchy address of A23 from that of A12
    through...