Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Regeneration of Corrupted or Lost Binary Files Required for Booting

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105901D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Craft, JL: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a proposed method of recovering lost binary files that normally reside on the system disk by generating them from the system's boot image. Using a software tool, the boot image will be unpacked to extract copies of the binary files which originally created the boot image. These copies are then put back onto the system disk to replace lost or corrupted files.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Method for Regeneration of Corrupted or Lost Binary Files Required for Booting

      Disclosed is a proposed method of recovering lost binary files
that normally reside on the system disk by generating them from the
system's boot image.  Using a software tool, the boot image will be
unpacked to extract copies of the binary files which originally
created the boot image.  These copies are then put back onto the
system disk to replace lost or corrupted files.

      The boot image is a conglomeration of several binary,
executable files including the configuration files and the UNIX
kernel.  Essentially, the boot image is a micro-operating system
containing enough information to get a system booted from the reset
state.  During boot up time, the resident Read Only Memory (ROM) will
start reading a portion of the boot image into system memory.  When
enough of the binary has been read in, the boot image takes over and
completes the system configuration and initialization.

      A problem exists when an important file, such as the /UNIX*
kernel file, gets corrupted or accidentally erased.  The system can
still boot up without the /UNIX file because a copy of that file has
been copied into the boot image.  Obviously, the user wants a copy of
the /UNIX to reside on the system disks in case it is needed for
construction of another, newer boot image.  However, the recovery of
that file is time consuming and troublesome with the current
procedures.  Currently, the user must go to either a backup medium or
the original install media of the operating system.  The user must
use the media, most...