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Browse Prior Art Database

Methodology for Application Output Routing on Multiple Display Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105921D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 108K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, WJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Currently, no method exists for allowing a user to specify the physical output display used by an application in displaying its output. Desktops assume that an invoked windowed application should display its output on the current desktop unless the application itself is configured to run otherwise. Operating systems may route full-screen session output to a second display if configured correctly. Neither of these options allows a user to dynamically select application output routing.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

Methodology for Application Output Routing on Multiple Display Systems

      Currently, no method exists for allowing a user to specify the
physical output display used by an application in displaying its
output.  Desktops assume that an invoked windowed application should
display its output on the current desktop unless the application
itself is configured to run otherwise.  Operating systems may route
full-screen session output to a second display if configured
correctly.  Neither of these options allows a user to dynamically
select application output routing.

      This invention involves a method whereby users specify the
physical display used by an application to present its output to that
user.  This method involves defining virtual output displays on the
base desktop.

      With this invention a user would define desktop objects which
represent physical displays other than the default display.  For
purposes of this invention the default display is referred to herein
as the base display and its desktop as the base desktop.  All
physical displays other than the base are spoken of as peripheral
displays.  Also, all desktops displayed on peripheral displays are
termed peripheral desktops within this invention.

      For example, a user has three displays attached to his
workstation.  One display is running in XGA mode, a second is running
in BGA mode and the third is running in VGA mode.  The user has the
workstation configured such that the base desktop runs from the XGA
display.  On the base desktop are three separate objects; each
representing a display and named accordingly.  When the user wishes
to run a word processor the desktop object representing the word
processor is dropped upon the desired display object (e.g., VGA
display) residing on the base desktop.  This causes the word
processor application output to be displayed on the VGA peripheral
display.

      If the word processor invoked has a graphical user interface
(GUI) and no other GUI applications are running on that desktop the
application runs on a bare desktop.  A bare desktop is defined as a
desktop having no opened objects.  Once the GUI application begins,
the desktop is no longer bare.  It is then referred to only as a
peripheral desktop.  Only icons representing running applications are
displayed on peripheral desktops.  Other GUI applications may run
concurrently on the same peripheral display and therefore share the
same desktop.  A peripheral desktop is present only so long as one or
more GUI applications are running on it.  If the word processor is a
full-screen application it may share the same peripheral display with
other full-screen applications and/or a peripheral desktop running
other applications.

      The user returns to the base desktop at any time by making it
active.  To make the base desktop active the user may invoke the
CTRL-ESC keystroke or stop one of the full-screen applications
running on a peri...