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Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Automatic Address Book Import in Conjunction with Scanned Paper Letters

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105925D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 70K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, WJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method and apparatus for automatically interpreting matter on a scanned image and importing it appropriately into a user's address book.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Method for Automatic Address Book Import in Conjunction with Scanned Paper Letters

      Disclosed is a method and apparatus for automatically
interpreting matter on a scanned image and importing it appropriately
into a user's address book.

      Current office systems allow scanning documents with scanners
or facsimile devices.  Users often scan paper documents such as
letters for the purpose of maintaining soft copies.  Many letters
contain letter headings for the originator of the letter, followed by
matter in the letter, and finally followed by a closing statement
with a signature, often including an informal name.  A method is
needed for automatically converting a letter letter head and closing
statement into an address book entry when paper letters or notes are
scanned into a system.

      All references to 'scanning' in the following descriptions are
interchangeably replaced with respective analogous situations
involved in faxing or scanning with a scanner.

      For example, a user wants to scan one or more letters into a
computer system for soft copy storage.  The letters were received
from the postal service and are sent from persons or companies which
should be maintained in the recipient's address book.  This invention
detects and converts letter head information along with closing
statement information into a connected address book while storing the
letter as textual matter in soft copy form.  A user simply places a
hand written check mark near the letter heading to identify the start
of the letter heading.  The Optical Character Recognition (OCR)
process will recognize this as the start of the letter head.  A check
on the paper document also serves as an archived indicator that the
document was processed.  In cases where at least one blank line is
not present between the letter head and letter matter, an ending
ch...