Browse Prior Art Database

User-Controlled Display of Hypermedia Links

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105952D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fitzpatrick, GP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

'Hypermedia' describes a user interface design where users can 'jump' to new information by selecting a link object. For instance, OS/2* 2.0's Help Manager allows developers to tag certain strings of text or graphics as 'links'. When users click on one of these links, a new window opens with information relevant to the link object. The window might show multimedia full-motion video, text, etc.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 60% of the total text.

User-Controlled Display of Hypermedia Links

      'Hypermedia' describes a user interface design where users can
'jump' to new information by selecting a link object.  For instance,
OS/2* 2.0's Help Manager allows developers to tag certain strings of
text or graphics as 'links'.  When users click on one of these links,
a new window opens with information relevant to the link object.  The
window might show multimedia full-motion video, text, etc.

      The usage of hypermedia links to allow users to jump to related
information is a growing trend in computer software.  For the user to
know that a given object (be it a string of text, an icon, or some
other type of object) has hypermedia associated with it, some sort of
feedback must be provided to the user.  Typically that feedback is
given in some visual way, such as reverse video text.  Unfortunately,
the visual indication can interfere with the understanding of the
information the link is imbedded in.

      Provided is the capability for a user to toggle the visibility
of hypermedia links.  When the user wants to concentrate on the
information currently in view, the link feedback, in whatever form,
can be turned off, to facilitate absorption of the information the
links are imbedded in.  The user can then turn the links back on at
any time.  The links are still active even when the feedback of their
presence is turned off.  For instance, if the links are activated by
the user's single-clicking with...