Browse Prior Art Database

Disk Files, Downloading Protocol for Work Station Customization on on Remote CTL

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105966D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brodd, JL: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A method of efficiently downloading the same table on many different sessions from a host system through a remote controller to many different devices is disclosed. The method downloads one copy of the same table when many copies are requested for different devices over a period of time.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 50% of the total text.

Disk Files, Downloading Protocol for Work Station Customization on on Remote CTL

      A method of efficiently downloading the same table on many
different sessions from a host system through a remote controller to
many different devices is disclosed.  The method downloads one copy
of the same table when many copies are requested for different
devices over a period of time.

      This method causes fewer copies of the same table to go over
the communications line, improving performance.

      This invention describes how tables called "Keyboard Translate
Tables" (KTTs) and "Printer Definition Tables" (PDTs) are downloaded
to a remote controller (5494) from a host system (AS/400*) in a way
that maximizes performance during download of these tables.

      Any dependent work station (DWS) attached to the remote 5494
controller can support KTTs, and 3486s, 3487s, 3488s, and later
versions of the 3477 display support PDTs.  When the workstation
powers up and the AS/400* "brings it up" to a signon screen, the KTT
or PDT table stored at the AS/400* host needs to be applied to that
workstation.

      Each KTT and PDT table has a name and a timestamp.  When the
AS/400* starts the download of the table, it sends JUST THE HEADER of
this table (which includes the name and timestamp) to the 5494.  The
5494 then compares it to a known list of table files kept on the
diskette in the 5494.  This list is "figured out" and put into memory
when the 5494 is powered up and updated whenever the files change,
and the list contains all names and timestamps for the tables.  The
"starting of download", where it sends the header, occurs after the
session has been established for the device.

      If the 5494 finds a matching name and header in the index, it
will load the file off of the disk and "apply" it to the device (in
the case of KTT, it's loaded into 5494 memory, as the 5494 controls
the KTT function; in the case of PDT, the PDT table is downloaded to
the 3477, 3486, or 3487.)  The 5494 will send a "completed" response
to the host AS/400*.

      If the 5494 finds no matching name and timestamp in the index
and there is a 5494 diskette file that is available (i.e. the KTT or
PDT file on the disk is not in use), then it will send back a
"Download Request", a request to the AS/400* to download the entire
table.  The AS/400* will then respond by sending the entire table; it
is then "applied" to the device and written to the disk file that was
available (so that later, it can be loaded from the disk file if
needed).  When it is applied, the 5494 sends a "completed" response
to the host AS/400*.

      If the 5494 finds no matching name and timestamp in the index
and all the diskette files are in use (the KTTs and PDTs on them are
being used by other devices) then an error message is sent back to
the AS/400* (the maximum number of KTTs or PDTs per controller are in
use).

      Some examples follow - here's an exampl...