Browse Prior Art Database

Active Examples and Dynamic Dialogs in Softcopy Via General Markup Language

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105980D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Wecker, AJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

When writing a dialog or an example for an electronic book it is difficult to convey the flow of an example or a dialog. Disclosed here is a solution to extend the GML by a following set of tags to include examples and dialogs which when used in a soft copy version would animate.

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Active Examples and Dynamic Dialogs in Softcopy Via General Markup Language

      When writing a dialog or an example for an electronic book it
is difficult to convey the flow of an example or a dialog.  Disclosed
here is a solution to extend the GML by a following set of tags to
include examples and dialogs which when used in a soft copy version
would animate.

The following example is given to the extension of the BookMaster
GML:

      scrgrp
               grpid   =  ssssss
               default =  nnnn

      escrgrp

      screen

      (Note: colons should be placed before scrgrp, escrgrp, screen.)
               grpid   =  ssssss
               number  =  nnnn
               step    =  STEP   | tttt
               beep    =  YES    | NO
               show    =  CLEAR  | OVERLAY

      In the softcopy read program they would be viewed by a program
which had the following controls:  step forward, step backward,
rewind, play, stop.

      The screens or dialogs (a similar markup set can be designed
for dialogs) are shown on the basis of the tagged information either
by having the user step through the process by acknowledging each
step (STEP) or by automatically timed action (after tttt seconds).

Whether a beep is sounded before displaying the screen is also in the
tag information and the control of whether to overl...