Browse Prior Art Database

Storage Reconfiguration Using Logical Storage Elements

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105993D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 66K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hough, RE: AUTHOR [+7]

Abstract

Computers, such as IBM ES/9000*, implement a concept of physical storage elements which are made up of one or more physical increments of storage. The size of each physical increment is machine dependant. These physical elements can be reconfigured using SCLP interfaces.

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Storage Reconfiguration Using Logical Storage Elements

      Computers, such as IBM ES/9000*, implement a concept of
physical storage elements which are made up of one or more physical
increments of storage.  The size of each physical increment is
machine dependant.  These physical elements can be reconfigured using
SCLP interfaces.

      This invention introduces a level of indirection by providing
logical elements which can be used to dynamically reconfigure storage
between logical partitions (LPs).  The LPAR hypervisor creates a
logical storage configuration for each logical partition.  A logical
storage element does not correspond to a physical element and does
not have to be the same size as a physical storage element.  The
logical element may consist of storage increments from different
physical elements.  Each LP believes it is running on its own machine
with it own storage elements.  The storage elements the LP sees are
not physical elements, they are logical elements.

      The control programs running in the logical partitions use the
SCLP interfaces designed for physical storage reconfiguration, but
with this invention, the result is to alter their logical storage
configuration.

      Alteration of the mapping of physical storage increments to
logical elements allows LPAR to provide storage reconfiguration
facilities which do not have restrictions present in earlier releases
of LPAR or require changes to the operating systems that support
storage reconfiguration.

This logical-to-physical mapping of storage element is an extension
of a more restricted technique described below:

Programs running in a computer system use add...