Browse Prior Art Database

Application Program Interfaces for Manipulating Domain Alias Definitions

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000105998D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Callaway, JR: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for manipulating LAN Server alias definitions through a programmatic interface.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Application Program Interfaces for Manipulating Domain Alias Definitions

      Disclosed is a method for manipulating LAN Server alias
definitions through a programmatic interface.

     In IBM OS/2*LAN Server, an alias is a nickname for a specific
file, print, or serial device resource on a specific server.  After
an alias is defined, a network resource can be referred to by its
alias rather than as a server/resource pair.  The use of aliases
makes LAN Server a more usable product, since the naming of network
resources is greatly simplified.  Aliases are widely used throughout
the product.

     Alias definitions are stored in database files that reside on
the domain controller.  Alias information can be manipulated by using
the LAN Server full-screen interface or by using the NET ALIAS
command from the command line interface.  The functionality of the
full-screen interface and the command line interface differ with
respect to aliases.  For example, external aliases can be created
only from the full-screen interface.  An external alias definition
describes a resource that resides on a server outside the user's
logon domain.

     The full-screen interface forces the user to deal with an alias
based on its type:  file, print, serial device, or external.  This is
sensible for some operations; for example, to add a file alias it is
helpful to be provided with a template of file alias-specific
attributes for which information is to be input.  However, this
approach is unnecessarily restrictive in other respects.  When
enumerating aliases, one might want to view a list of all...