Browse Prior Art Database

Management for Interactive Multimedia Interface Screens

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106003D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 63K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

deNijis, RHJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a process for displaying appropriate session interface screens on user workstations when accessing a variety of multimedia sources distributed on a network.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Management for Interactive Multimedia Interface Screens

      Disclosed is a process for displaying appropriate session
interface screens on user workstations when accessing a variety of
multimedia sources distributed on a network.

      Two key features of this process are:  (1) that interface
screens are resident at the user workstation for any session; and (2)
that only a single control-character needs to be transmitted to the
user workstation in order to initiate any interface screen.

      This Screen Management process was developed for a network
system that permits users to request multiple sessions, each of which
invokes different multimedia sources distributed on a network.  That
is, one session can use a video tape as its source; another, a video
camera; and another, a video disk player.  When requesting a source,
the user (workstation) is not aware of the actual source and does not
know which interface screen should be displayed.  Since each source
requires unique user-interface functions, an interface screen with
source-specific functions must be presented to the user, and a fast
transition between interface screen must occur when the user toggles
between devices.

           For example, when a user prepares a video tape player to
record from a video disk player, control between the two players must
be alternated to assure that the queues are in place.  When switched
from one device to the other, the interface screens must correspond
with the required functions.  Obviously, this entire switching
process must occur quickly and efficiently in order for it to be
usable.  The problem that is posed is two-fold:  (1) How will the
appropriate session screen be displayed on the user work...