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Conduction Cooled Ferrite Core in a High Power Transformer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106016D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 84K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Rao, A: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a thermal conduction path for cooling the ferrite core of a high power transformer or inductor. As power supplies convert higher power levels in a smaller volume of space, the necessity for an efficient cooling technique becomes a requirement with increasingly higher power density designs.

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Conduction Cooled Ferrite Core in a High Power Transformer

      Disclosed is a thermal conduction path for cooling the ferrite
core of a high power transformer or inductor.  As power supplies
convert higher power levels in a smaller volume of space, the
necessity for an efficient cooling technique becomes a requirement
with increasingly higher power density designs.

      Ferrite core material losses are a function of material
composition, operating frequency, flux density, and ambient operating
temperature.  Core losses are dissipated as heat.  The ferrite core
itself is a poor thermal conductor.  Ferrite is non-flexible brittle
material and will fracture and crack when mechanically stressed.

      Previous cooling remedies of high power cooling via potting
material or clamping between coldplate surfaces have resulted in
cracked cores due to expansion coefficient and brittleness of the
ferrite.  Surface cooling via air flow is by far the most used
cooling method.

      The solution described here provides a means to access more
core surface area for a given core cross sectional area.  By
accessing a higher percentage of surface area with a good thermal
medium, the core can be effectively conduction cooled to a coldplate
surface or other heatsink.  The increased exposed core surface area
is created by sectionalizing the core.  Referring to the Figure, note
that the "EE" core has been sectionalized into 3 identical cores.
The section thickness is a variable which results in flexibility for
the number of sections for a given core cross sectional area.

Between each core section (and optionally at each end) there is
placed a cooling spacer which accesses core surface area made
available by sectionalizing the core material.  Additionally, aside
from increasing accessible surface area, the cooling spacer also
provides a conduction cooling p...