Browse Prior Art Database

Logical Monitor Switch

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106077D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cahill, LM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

There is, at times, a strong need (i.e., in a class, during a demo, when multiple control units are hooked up to one monitor...) to view the screen/monitor of a workstation while also viewing the screen contents of the screen of another machine (i.e., instructor's machine, lab partner). This invention gives an easy way to perform this task.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Logical Monitor Switch

      There is, at times, a strong need (i.e., in a class, during a
demo, when multiple control units are hooked up to one monitor...) to
view the screen/monitor of a workstation while also viewing the
screen contents of the screen of another machine (i.e., instructor's
machine, lab partner).  This invention gives an easy way to perform
this task.

      A set of pushbuttons would be added to certain monitor models
enabling them to view the full screen's contents on only part (1/4)
of the actual screen.  The buttons (text graphic below as Figure)
would enable the user to view any combination of four different
control unit screen output views on one screen.  Example:  In a lab
there is insufficient physical space to house a screen for each
machine in the room, so multiple machines are hooked to one screen.
In the current art, the lab user would have to use a data
transmission switch to view each of the machines screen output one at
a time, flipping through the different screens like changing channels
on a television.

      This invention would allow the user to view each of, up to
four, control unit screen views on one screen at the same time.
Example:  In a classroom, a student needs to view the instructor's
screen while viewing his/her own screen view, (such as to compare
code, or the answers of a test); this invention would solve this
problem.

      The only hardware prerequisite would be that the monitor would
need four control unit input hookups (rather than one).  A set of
four pushbutton switches would need to be added to the front of the
monitor to allow the user to "turn on" any of the control unit screen
views, and positioning of the logical screen views.

      Another usage example of this invention:  If a software
usability group were following multiple test subjects in a test, with
each on a different machine, then they could monitor all the people
from their one screen at once.

Mapping example:

Control    monitor output cables    to users machine and all four to
Units                               the usability monitoring machine
(UMM) --------  ...