Browse Prior Art Database

Modular Problem Specification for Decision Support System Interfaces

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106086D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ahmadi, A: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In the design of a decision support system (DSS), a user interface needs to be constructed to allow the user to describe a problem to be solved to the system. An important feature of the DSS is the ability to perform what-if analyses, and sensitivity analyses by generating a number of problems that are slight variations of the original problem.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Modular Problem Specification for Decision Support System Interfaces

      In the design of a decision support system (DSS), a user
interface needs to be constructed to allow the user to describe a
problem to be solved to the system.  An important feature of the DSS
is the ability to perform what-if analyses, and sensitivity analyses
by generating a number of problems that are slight variations of the
original problem.

      Typically, DSS interfaces allow a user to construct the entire
problem by specify the individual elements of the problem.  To create
alternative scenarios for what-if and sensitivity analyses, one needs
to specify the change to the individual elements.  What generally
happens then is that the original problem is copied and the user
changes only certain elements.

      The disadvantage of such an approach is that in the case of
problems that involve massive amounts of data, such as in planning
and simulation problems, there is considerable duplication of data
that quickly consumes disk space.  The user also often loses track of
the changes in the different problems created without going over each
element in the problem specification.  Users faced with such choices
often choose to not create copies of problems to make their changes,
but to change the original copy of the problem specification instead.
This may lead to considerable confusion later as to which scenarios
have been explored and what was the original problem specification.

      Proposed i...