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Secure and Private Communications in General Network

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106119D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dolev, D: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A method is described for ensuring a complete secure and private communication between a pair of processors in a general network. The new method enables overcoming any t faults as long as there are 2t+1 independent paths connecting the two parties. The paths can be either direct connections (wires) or deferent sequences of processors relaying the information. In what follows a wire will correspond to either cases, and will contain the set of processors on the path.

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Secure and Private Communications in General Network

      A method is described for ensuring a complete secure and
private communication between a pair of processors in a general
network.  The new method enables overcoming any t faults as long as
there are 2t+1 independent paths connecting the two parties.  The
paths can be either direct connections (wires) or deferent sequences
of processors relaying the information.  In what follows a wire will
correspond to either cases, and will contain the set of processors on
the path.

      The method permits the two parties to agree on a secret 1-time
pad such that for any subset of t wires, the collected information
sent along these wires reveals no information about the pad.  Thus,
secrecy is perfect.  No collaboration of faults can reveal the secret
or prevent the parties from exchanging it.  Note that once the
parties agrees on the 1-time pad, they can exchange any information
publicly using that 1-time pad.

      The method is practiced as follows.  M number of random bits
are sent from processor A to processor B over a set of wires,
distributed in accordance with [1], making up checking shares for the
wires.  The checking shares for the wires are interpolated, and the
results are compared with the values received by B over the wires.
If, for a given wire, the value received does not match the
interpolated checking share, then a fault is indicated, and a vector
identifying the wire, the received value, an...