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Browse Prior Art Database

Combined Keyboard and Mouse

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106125D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 106K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Tucker, RB: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article pertains to hardware that falls into the Personal Work Station category. In this particular case the idea was formulated using the IBM*PS/2* Model 70 and IBM Mouse. The idea can be applied to any system, either IBM's or other equipment manufacturer's hardware, where a keyboard and mouse are utilized together with a software application.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Combined Keyboard and Mouse

      This article pertains to hardware that falls into the Personal
Work Station category.  In this particular case the idea was
formulated using the IBM*PS/2* Model 70 and IBM Mouse.  The idea can
be applied to any system, either IBM's or other equipment
manufacturer's hardware, where a keyboard and mouse are utilized
together with a software application.

      Specific program products are not germane to the description of
this article although software would be needed to translate the
hardware impulses to information decipherable by the operating system
as is done for current hardware devices.

      This article relates to the combining of two separate hardware
devices.  They are the data entry keyboard used on most computers and
a mouse that is more commonly seen on personal work stations.  The
keyboard is used for data entry and cursor positioning by the user
either as input to an application or to the system program.  The
mouse is used to move the cursor to a particular point on the screen,
either to choose from a list or to place the cursor where data must
be entered.  The current mouse is hand held and requires that it be
moved by the user on top of a flat surface such as a desk.

      This article physically combines the data entry keyboard and
mouse to provide a single piece of hardware that can be used by the
operator for both inputting data and pointing to a particular area on
the display.

      Today's personal work station generally consists of four
distinct hardware devices.  They are the CPU, display, data entry
keyboard and mouse.  This combination of hardware is generally used
to run software applications locally or as a remote terminal to a
larger host computer.  The general requirements of software whether
it be an operating system or specific application such as a planning
tool is that they require data input from the user.  This entry
operation is usually structured so that the data must be entered in
specific areas or "fields".  When entry into fields is required the
field is pointed to by use of the cursor on the display either
through the cursor control keys on the keyboard or through a mouse.
When using the mouse the computer is signalled that the cursor is in
the correct position by "clicking" with the keys on the mouse, then
the user enters the data through the keyboard.  If the keyboard
cursor control keys were used the user needs only type in the data.

      Some applications have been made more usabl...