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Browse Prior Art Database

Application Program Interfaces for Manipulating Domain Application Definitions

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106176D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 69K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Callaway, JR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for manipulating LAN Server application definitions through a user interface.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Application Program Interfaces for Manipulating Domain Application Definitions

      Disclosed is a method for manipulating LAN Server application
definitions through a user interface.

     In LAN Server, applications can be defined which can be shared
by many users across the network.  These applications fall into one
of two categories:  public applications or private applications.  An
application has several items associated with it, including the name
and location of the executable program, the command line needed to
start the program, the interface associated with the application, and
so on.  Optionally, it may also have a number of network assignments
associated with it.  These network assignments are redirections to
network resources that are made when the application is started and
deleted when the application stops.

     Application definitions are stored in a database file that
resides on the domain controller.  The only means available for
adding, deleting, or changing application information is the LAN
Server full-screen interface.

     The full-screen interface forces the user to deal with an
application based on its type.  This approach can be rather
cumbersome.  For example, the user cannot see a list of all the
applications defined in the domain.  The user must instead look at
three separate lists of applications:  public DOS, public OS/2, and
private OS/2.

     The full-screen interface does not allow network assignments to
be associated with an application at the time that the application is
created.  Instead, the user is forced to go through two separate
sequences of pan...