Browse Prior Art Database

Method to Recover from Failed Boot Drive Using Diskettes

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000106255D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-20
Document File: 2 page(s) / 63K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Poigin, E: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

When the boot disk fails on a server machine, manually restoring it can be a long tedious process. Additionally, any customization of the installed code must be redone.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Method to Recover from Failed Boot Drive Using Diskettes

      When the boot disk fails on a server machine, manually
restoring it can be a long tedious process.  Additionally, any
customization of the installed code must be redone.

      When LAN Server 3.0 Fault Tolerance support is used, the boot
drive can be mirrored.  In this way, the base system code and all its
customization has a backup copy available.  However, OS/2* and the
OS/2 Boot Manager do not recognize the mirror partition as a usable
drive.  So, while the code has been backed up, it is not available
for booting the system.
     The normal method to recover from a boot disk failure is to:

  - Replace the failed disk
  - Do any necessary hardware preparation of the new disk
  - IPL the system from the OS/2 Install diskettes
  - Install OS/2 and IPL
  - Install LAN Server and IPL
  - Activate Fault Tolerance support
  - Recover the original boot drive and IPL
  - Copy any customization information from the recovered drive
    to the new boot drive.

      The above procedure is time consuming and requires someone
trained in installing and configuring OS/2 and LAN Server.  It is not
unusual to take 8 hours to install and configure the software.  It
also requires access to all the original install diskettes.

      The solution to this problem is to make use of the secondary
partition (mirror) of the boot drive that is still on one of the
system disks.

      FTREMOTE, the response-file-driven utility, was written t...